To all Triathlon, Marathon and Swimming Students

I am very sorry to inform everyone that I will not be able to finish the remainder of the semester. My son Isaac has been diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and we are currently at the Oakland Children’s Hospital. We have a battle in front of us, but it is a battle that we will win! I would appreciate any prayers or good thoughts you could send our way. It has truly been my pleasure to coach all of you.

Thank You!

Scott Young

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SUMMER TRIATHLON CLASSES

Summer Triathlon and Swimming for Fitness classes start in May. Go to epaws to register soon!!!! Classes fill up fast!!!!

May 16th Mini Term Swimming For Fitness 6-8pm m,t,w,th 3 weeks

June 6th First Session Triathlon PEX 199 F01 37405 SPECIAL TOPICS 7-8:30 am m,t,w,th 5 weeks

Swim for Fitness 6-7:15 m,t,w,th 5 weeks

July 11th Second Session TriathlonPEX 199 S01 42095 SPECIAL TOPICS m,t,w,th 5 weeks

Swim for Fitness m,t,w,th 5weeks

*Rock-n-River Run Special: 15% Discount MY STUDENTS!!
*Register at Active.com use the name “scott young” as the discount code.
Rock-n-River Marathon, 1/2 marathon, 10k and 5k race Is May 1st. Go to CastleRockproduction.com for info.

All students receive credit for racing or volunteering. For info call 775-846-0706.

Triathlon Summer Schedule/ Local Events

The 1st ever “ Big N Race” or “Nk” (BIG” N” RUN) will be held on April 9, 2011. It’s 4.5 miles run/walk, starting in front of NYE HALL.
Early registration starts April 4-April 8, from 6pm-10pm in the Mezz in Argenta Hall : $10 .(Be one of the first 50 entrants to sign up and get a FREE T-SHIRT! )Race day registration will be starting at 9am in front of NYE HALL; $13

*Rock-n-River Run Special: 50% Discount MY STUDENTS!!
*Register at Active.com use the name “scott young” as the discount code.
Rock-n-River Marathon, 1/2 marathon, 10k and 5k race Is May 1st. Go to CastleRockproduction.com for info.

All students receive credit for racing or volunteering. For info call 775-846-0706.

Summer Triathlon and Swimming for Fitness classes start in May. Go to epaws to register soon!!!! Classes fill up fast!!!!

May 16th Mini Term Swimming For Fitness 6-8pm m,t,w,th 3 weeks

June 6th First Session Triathlon 7-8:30 am m,t,w,th 5 weeks
Swim for Fitness 6-7:15 m,t,w,th 5 weeks

July 11th Second Session Triathlon m,t,w,th 5 weeks
Swim for Fitness m,t,w,th 5wee

Aerobic vs. Anaerobic

Calendar:

  • Presidents day is Monday 2-21-11. No class that day.

UNR Triathlon Club is open to all levels of ability. We meet 4 times per week for 70 min. workout. Come try it for free for week. You just need a Lombardi Pass. The fee is $200 per semester.

Aerobic vs. Anaerobic

As you exercise your body is using different fuel at each level of intensity. That’s because the body requires two oxygen molecules to metabolize one molecule of fat. As the pace increases and working muscles are using more and more oxygen the body switches to carbohydrates. Carbohydrates require only one oxygen molecule to be metabolized as fuel. So, when you are working harder, you burn more carbohydrates and when you are going easier you are burning more fat. You may have heard the term conversation pace. If you are able to talk and exercise at the same time, then there is enough available oxygen to burn fat as fuel and talk at the same time.

The body has an unlimited supply of fat, even the skinniest person has enough fat stored to burn as fuel for several days. The trick is unleashing it through training. To do this, one must spend most of his or her training aerobically. Other sessions above this zone are also required but usually less then 1 hour per week. These are done at or above the anaerobic threshold. Anaerobic threshold(AT) is the point at which your body goes from using fat as its primary fuel source to glycogen. This occurs at 80% to 90% of your max heart rate in most cases.

Training at or near your anaerobic threshold(AT) for several hours per week is the most efficient way to improve performance, but only after a sufficient base is established. The best way to find your Threshold is to have a Vo2 max test done. This will identify which training level or heart rate you become anaerobic. Having a lab test performed can be expensive. If your resources are limited you can estimate AT by subtracting 12 to 15 beats from your max heart rate. This will give you a good ballpark figure.

You can also estimate your AT by using your recent race results. For example, a trained runner’s AT pace is usually 10 seconds per mile slower than their 10k pace. This pace lies just at the cusp of anaerobic metabolism, and can be performed continuously for one hour.

February Newsletter – week 1

UP COMING EVENTS

(ALL EVENT WILL COUNT FOR MAKING UP ABSENCES, JUST BRING YOUR RACE NUMBER)

2011

  • 2-6 SAN FANCISCO 1/2 MARATHON
  • 2-13 10AM YOU’VE GOT TO BE CRAZY RUN VERDI 10K/5K
  • 3-5 BIDWELL CLASIC 1/2 MARATHON 5K CHICO CA

.

Finding Your Maximum Heart Rate

Before you can train in the proper zones you first have to determine your maximum heart rate. Maximum heart rate refers to the maximum heart rate your body can achieve, or the highest number of beats in one minute during exercise. Once you determine this, figuring out the other zones is easy. The best way to measure your max heart rate is to have a test done in a lab. Again, this can be very expensive. Another more practical way is to do a field test.

Max Heart Rate Field Test (Athletes should be healthy and have been cleared by a Doctor before performing this test.) After a sufficient warm-up run 3 x 400m with increasing intensity for each. Next, run a 1⁄2 mile (800m) all out, check your monitor at the end for your max heart rate. Cool down with an easy 1⁄2 mile. Add 2 beats to every 1000 feet of elevation.

Another option for finding max heart rate is the well known 220 – your age formula. This formula is widely used but its accuracy is questionable. A more accurate formula created by Sally Edwards, a long time endurance athlete and author of many training books, uses the following method.

Male:

210 – 1/2 your age – 1% of your total body weight + 4 = Predicted Maximum Heart Rate

Female:

210 – 1/2 your age – 1% of your total body weight + 0 = Predicted Maximum Heart Rate

Using A Heart Rate Monitor:

Heart monitors can be very valuable training tools. They provide a window into what the body is doing. If you are using a heart monitor for the first time there are a few things you need to know.

First, your maximum heart rate is specific to you. In other words, it is not a contest to see who can get their heart rate the highest. Age doesn’t always determine it. Secondly, if you use a monitor during a race, keep in mind that adrenaline and nervous energy will cause a higher then normal reading. Max heart rate goes down with age, about 1 beat per minute per year after the age of 30.

Example: a 43 years male that weighs 170 pounds.

210 – 21.5 – 1.7 + 4 = a max heart rate of 190

Assesing your Fitness

Now it is time to put it together. Finding the right combination of training stresses and recovery is very important to progress smoothly in this sport, and to experience steady improvement without injury. It is wise to start with a sprint or international distance race. Later as you gain confidence and experience, work your way up to the longer distances.

As a rule of thumb, train a minimum of 3 times the distance in one week, of the race you’re attempting. For example; if your goal is an Olympic distance race which is a .9 mile swim, a 24.6 mile bike and a 6.2 miles run, your total mileage for the week should be 3 miles of swimming or approximately 5000 yards, 75 miles of biking and 18 miles of running all broken up into different workouts on different days.

Year Round Strength Training

There are many strength-training programs out there. Some are designed to build mass like in bodybuilding. This program is designed to produce an increase in power as it applies to multi-sport racing, or an increase in strength without necessarily an increase in size. Here are a few guidelines before you get started. For more information on this program, see: The Triathlete’s Training Bible By Joe Friel.

  • Stick to the exercises that give you the most bang for your buck.
  • Focus on the major muscle groups, like quads, hams, chest and Lats. .
  • Do some core work with every session
  • Keep the number of exercises low. In other words have more depth than breadth.
  • Change the routine every few weeks
  • Always warm-up for at least 5 minutes before and stretch after

Muscle Groups ( Choose one exercise per muscle group)

Quadriceps

  • Squats, Lunges, Seated Leg Press.

Hamstrings

  • Leg Curl, Dead Lifts.

Lats. ( 2 of the following)

  • Cable Pull Down
  • Pull-ups
  • Vasa Swim Trainer
  • Seated Row

Chest

  • Push-ups , Bench Press, Chest Press

Phase 1 ( Adapting the Muscles. December / January )

8-12 sessions total

2-3 sessions per week

40-60% of one rep. max.

3-5 sets per session

Movement=slow

Recover one minute after each set.

Phase 2 ( Maximum Strength January / February)

8-12 total sessions

2 sessions per week

90 % of one rep. max.

3-6 reps per set

3 – sets per session

Movement=slow

Recover 3 minutes after each set

Phase 3 ( Muscle Endurance March /April)

6-8 total sessions

1-2 sessions per week

40-60 % of one rep max.

8-15 per set

Movement = controlled fast

Recover :30 seconds after each set

Phase 4 ( Muscle Instability May)

Add stability ball or Bosu

4-6 total sessions

1-2 sessions per week

1-3 sets per session

30-50 reps per set

30 to 50 % on one rep. max.

Movement = moderate speed

recover one minute between sets

Phase 5 ( Maintenance , Race season )

16-20 sessions

1 sessions per week

3 sets per set

60 to 80 to 90 % of one rep max

8 to 10 to 12 reps for each set

Movement = moderate

Recover 1 to 2 minutes after each set