February Newsletter – week 1

UP COMING EVENTS

(ALL EVENT WILL COUNT FOR MAKING UP ABSENCES, JUST BRING YOUR RACE NUMBER)

2011

  • 2-6 SAN FANCISCO 1/2 MARATHON
  • 2-13 10AM YOU’VE GOT TO BE CRAZY RUN VERDI 10K/5K
  • 3-5 BIDWELL CLASIC 1/2 MARATHON 5K CHICO CA

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Finding Your Maximum Heart Rate

Before you can train in the proper zones you first have to determine your maximum heart rate. Maximum heart rate refers to the maximum heart rate your body can achieve, or the highest number of beats in one minute during exercise. Once you determine this, figuring out the other zones is easy. The best way to measure your max heart rate is to have a test done in a lab. Again, this can be very expensive. Another more practical way is to do a field test.

Max Heart Rate Field Test (Athletes should be healthy and have been cleared by a Doctor before performing this test.) After a sufficient warm-up run 3 x 400m with increasing intensity for each. Next, run a 1⁄2 mile (800m) all out, check your monitor at the end for your max heart rate. Cool down with an easy 1⁄2 mile. Add 2 beats to every 1000 feet of elevation.

Another option for finding max heart rate is the well known 220 – your age formula. This formula is widely used but its accuracy is questionable. A more accurate formula created by Sally Edwards, a long time endurance athlete and author of many training books, uses the following method.

Male:

210 – 1/2 your age – 1% of your total body weight + 4 = Predicted Maximum Heart Rate

Female:

210 – 1/2 your age – 1% of your total body weight + 0 = Predicted Maximum Heart Rate

Using A Heart Rate Monitor:

Heart monitors can be very valuable training tools. They provide a window into what the body is doing. If you are using a heart monitor for the first time there are a few things you need to know.

First, your maximum heart rate is specific to you. In other words, it is not a contest to see who can get their heart rate the highest. Age doesn’t always determine it. Secondly, if you use a monitor during a race, keep in mind that adrenaline and nervous energy will cause a higher then normal reading. Max heart rate goes down with age, about 1 beat per minute per year after the age of 30.

Example: a 43 years male that weighs 170 pounds.

210 – 21.5 – 1.7 + 4 = a max heart rate of 190

Assesing your Fitness

Now it is time to put it together. Finding the right combination of training stresses and recovery is very important to progress smoothly in this sport, and to experience steady improvement without injury. It is wise to start with a sprint or international distance race. Later as you gain confidence and experience, work your way up to the longer distances.

As a rule of thumb, train a minimum of 3 times the distance in one week, of the race you’re attempting. For example; if your goal is an Olympic distance race which is a .9 mile swim, a 24.6 mile bike and a 6.2 miles run, your total mileage for the week should be 3 miles of swimming or approximately 5000 yards, 75 miles of biking and 18 miles of running all broken up into different workouts on different days.

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